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Patients not following diet recommendation that lack taste?

Make them switch to low Gl atta with no compromise on taste.


Why is switching to Aashirvaad Sugar Release Control Atta important?

Noodles, vermicelli, refined flour breads, kulchas, and pao bread are being increasingly consumed. Refined carbohydrates are mainly rapidly digesting starches, which lead to higher postprandial glucose peak, a reported problem with Indians.

Reference: 1) Gulati S, Misra A. Abdominal obesity and type 2 diabetes in Asian Indians: dietary strategies including edible oils, cooking practices and sugar intake. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2017;71:850–7

Taste vs Health—the everyday challenge

Some of the main reasons patients cite for not following the diet modifications are not liking the advised diet and not getting the necessary support to prepare the advised diet.1 Therefore, modifying the diet pattern of patients remains a challenge for most doctors.

Many of the food items recommended by doctors as healthy alternatives may be bitter or unfamiliar in taste, and difficult to procure. For example, it can be difficult for patients to consume coarser, unfamiliar tasting and difficult to prepare millet bhakris (dry rotis) instead of the soft atta rotis they are used to.

Aashirvaad Sugar Release Control Atta–Uncompromised taste

Wheat rotis, a staple form of carbohydrates, feature prominently in the Indian meal plan.5 You can ask your patients to swap their regular atta with Aashirvaad Sugar Release Control atta. Low GI Aashirvaad Sugar Release Control atta releases its sugar slowly in the body and can be an important part of a healthy meal plan.

Reference: 1) Gulati S, Misra A. Abdominal obesity and type 2 diabetes in Asian Indians: dietary strategies including edible oils, cooking practices and sugar intake. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2017;71:850–7